5 of the most unique game lodges in Africa

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/31/5-of-the-most-unique-game-lodges-in-africa/

Settled amidst Africa’s stunningly diverse landscapes and elusive wildlife, hundreds of luxurious lodges and camps provide an opulent space to relax in between exploring everything this unspoilt continent has to offer. Nevertheless, with cosy décor, gourmet cuisine, awe-inspiring experiences and spectacular views offered at nearly every property, sometimes you just want to find something completely […]

5 of the most unique game lodges in Africa is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post 5 of the most unique game lodges in Africa appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/31/5-of-the-most-unique-game-lodges-in-africa/

Settled amidst Africa’s stunningly diverse landscapes and elusive wildlife, hundreds of luxurious lodges and camps provide an opulent space to relax in between exploring everything this unspoilt continent has to offer. Nevertheless, with cosy décor, gourmet cuisine, awe-inspiring experiences and spectacular views offered at nearly every property, sometimes you just want to find something completely […]

5 of the most unique game lodges in Africa is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post 5 of the most unique game lodges in Africa appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

8 Myths About Solo Female Travel Debunked

Posted from http://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blogs/solo-female-travel-myths/

Woman walking on beach
Kristin Addis from Be My Travel Muse writes our regular column on solo female travel. It’s an important topic I can’t adequately cover, so I brought in an expert to share her advice for other women travelers to help cover the topics important and specific to them! She’s amazing and knowledgable. This month, we are starting the year off with some of the common myths people have about solo female travel!

I had a lot of misconceptions about traveling alone before I went overseas. I thought it might be dangerous, lonely, too much work, or make people think that I didn’t have any friends. Moreover, I always thought that being alone as a woman would make me a target for terrible things (thanks, mainstream media!). Plus, who wants to see all these amazing places completely alone? It sounded like a non-option, at least at first.

Then I realized that nobody had the time to go with me. My friends were working on their careers while I had just decided to take a break from mine. I couldn’t wait. I just had to go, or else I might never go.

So I went alone and found out that all of my assumptions about traveling solo were dead wrong. I wasn’t lonely, I didn’t end up kidnapped, and, in a lot of ways, it was actually way better to travel by myself. The freedom it afforded me, the way it grew my confidence, and all of the new friends I made were huge benefits that wouldn’t have happened it I went with a group of friends.

So for everyone who thinks that solo travel is lonely, dangerous, or boring, I want my first column ofthe new year to be on the common solo female travel myths — and why they are all wrong – to help give you the courage to get over your fears and conquer the year:

Myth #1: Solo traveling means being lonely often.

Solo female travel
The scariest thing about traveling by yourself is the thought that you might be alone for your entire vacation, right? Who wants to travel to the other side of the world only to have to be by herself while looking at the majestic red sunrise over Angkor Wat?

I was really worried about this before I started traveling solo. Thankfully, I came to find that I made more friends in one week on the road than I had in a whole year back at home.

The best thing about traveling solo is that you’re not the only one doing it. More and more women are considering the concept of solo traveling to be realistic these days, and I couldn’t believe how many other solo female travelers there were on the road with me! Since so many other people are in the same boat, they tend to be pretty outgoing and friendly. It’s as simple as staying in a social hostel — you can easily find which those are by doing a quick search on Hostelworld — and heading to the common room. I regularly did that all over Southeast Asia and I rarely felt alone during my years of traveling there.

Myth #2: Solo traveling is only for those who are single.

Solo female hiking
Before I started traveling and meeting people with all kinds of different stories and backgrounds, I figured that if you’re traveling by yourself, it must be because you don’t have a significant other. People who have commitments like a family or partner don’t just go traveling on their own. It must mean there’s a problem in the relationship or that they’re escaping their commitments, right?

Wrong. I came to learn that plenty of people who are in relationships travel alone, and for all kinds of reasons.

It could just be that they have different interests, something many relationship experts say is totally healthy. Maybe their partner can’t get time off from work, or maybe both parties made a conscious decision to do some soul-searching on a solo adventure, even just for a portion of the trip, and meet back up again.

Many solo travelers are single, but there are many more who are in relationships too. Just because you’re not single doesn’t mean you can’t have an awesome trip by yourself.

Myth #3: You must be extraordinarily brave to travel on your own.

Solo woman in cave
A lot of my friends thought I was ultra brave and independent because I was going to travel alone. The honest truth is that I was incredibly scared and overwhelmed with the idea of traveling solo until I finally just got on the plane and went. To fear what you don’t know is just to be human. It’s in our nature.

Despite being terrified, I went anyway. Later I laughed at how scared I had been, after I realized that getting around, meeting new people, and finding things to eat was all way easier than I had ever thought it could be.

You don’t have to be sure of everything and incredibly courageous to go traveling on your own. Those things may come as a nice benefit of traveling solo, but they don’t have to be prerequisites. The hardest part is getting on the plane. After that, it’s surprisingly easy to get around language barriers, figure out timetables, and have an adventure. Plenty of locals speak at least some English, and Google Maps, translation apps, and cellphone connectivity have all made traveling so much easier than it used to be.

Myth #4: You can’t be an introvert.

Woman hiking in mountains
I used to quietly watch the TV in bars or wear my headphones in public places so that I wouldn’t have to talk to anyone. I used to feel pretty paralyzed in a room with someone with a strong personality. Basically, I was kind of awkward.

But an incredible benefit of traveling by myself is that it has made me super outgoing. Even if you have trouble starting a conversation, in a hostel common room, chances are really good that eventually someone will reach out to you and bring you into a conversation. I recall that in the Philippines, a girl tapped me and asked where I’m from, and after chatting for a while, we became friends and hung out all week.

You will probably also find that after a few times approaching new people — which will be incredibly nerve-racking at first — they will be so much more open than you feared that it will be an encouraging surprise. It’s so easy to start a conversation by simply asking somebody where they’re from or where they just came from. I know those are cliché, but they also work, and before you know it, you have something to talk about.

It’s easy to build up confidence around travelers — they’re just really friendly people!

Myth #5: It’s dangerous to travel solo, especially as a woman.

Woman walking in desert
You’ve seen the movie, Taken, right? The one where Liam Neeson’s daughter gets kidnapped in Europe and he kicks major butt and rescues her? Or what about Brokedown Palace, where Claire Danes gets thrown in Thai jail when a handsome stranger plants drugs on her? This is our image of girls traveling the world (thanks, Hollywood!). I’m guessing that, given dramatic stories like these, the biggest argument against solo travel that you might be hearing from your friends and family is that it is dangerous.

First of all, neither of the protagonists in those movies actually was traveling solo. Maybe if they had been, they would have paused and listened to their voices of reason and stayed out of trouble.

Staying safe on the road is all about trusting your intuition, behaving abroad like you would at home. Would you get super drunk alone at a bar at home? Would you walk around alone at night? Talk to the locals at your guesthouse about what you should watch out for, and practice common sense. What kept you alive at home and keeps you alive on the road, too.

For more check out this post all about solo female travel safety.

And take a look at these blogs for inspiration and proof women can travel alone:

Every day millions of women travel the world alone. It’s safe and doable, and you won’t end up in a ditch!

Myth #6: You will constantly get unwanted attention.

Woman walking on beach
It happened from car windows when I was walking home from school at age 14, it happened when I was getting into my car at a random gas station in the middle of nowhere in Nevada, and it happens when I walk down the streets of New York City. Sometimes a boyfriend was only a few steps away — it didn’t matter. Catcalls happen abroad and at home. They’re annoying, yes, but don’t let them keep you from having the awesome solo trip you deserve.

The best way to deal with that kind of attention is to make sure you understand the modesty requirements in the countries that you visit and dress accordingly. Some women suggest wearing a wedding band, but I find that being very confident, looking people in the eye, and being respectfully assertive are all good ways to stand my ground as well.

While simply being a female does open you up for catcalls and unwanted advances in some parts of the world, in many cases, though, it’s quite the opposite, and I’m treated with respect and kindness, particularly because I’m a woman traveling on her own.

Myth #7: It’s way more work because you have to do everything yourself.

Woman walking on beach
If you travel on your own, you will be making all of the decisions.

This is also the biggest benefit of traveling solo. It means that you don’t have to plan ahead if you don’t want to, worry about whether the other person is having fun or not, or stress about doing everything for two or more people. Solo travelers get to have more serendipitous fun, the novelty of which we are hardwired to crave. There’s often room for just one more on a motorbike, in the car, or at a local’s family dinner, and you’ll be able to make split-second decisions without asking anyone first.

I found that the benefit of complete freedom while traveling solo outweighed the extra legwork that I had to do. I also found it easy to just ask a friend which restaurant or activity they liked, or the person working at the hostel counter. It’s not that hard. (Besides, planning everything for multiple people and keeping them happy is a lot of work too.)

Myth #8: Traveling solo is a huge, life-changing decision.

Woman sitting on a glacier
A lot of people sell off everything they have and take off to the other side of the world with a one-way ticket in hand (I’m talking about myself here), but that doesn’t mean that everyone who travels solo has turned her life upside down in order to do it.

It can be as simple as a weekend trip alone to another city, a two-week jaunt to a warm and tropical place you’ve never been, or a monthlong solo backpacking trip in Europe between semesters. It doesn’t have to be a huge deal, and you could come right back to life as you know it before, with a few new adventures and a bit more confidence.

****It turned out that, contrary to what everyone (including me) thought, solo traveling wasn’t dangerous, boring, or lonely at all. It actually was one of the most social activities I’ve ever tried.

I ended up finding that, instead of solo traveling being a disadvantage in any way, it was actually advantageous to be free when I traveled. It endeared me more to locals, and I got to have unique experiences because I could say yes to everything, and that’s something that only solo travelers can say. It’s a big benefit to be able to go where you want when you want, without having to answer to anyone else. There must be a reason why it keeps growing in popularity year after year, right?

If traveling is about the benefits, the time spent in a new reality, and a departure from your normal, everyday life, then to traveling solo is to put those benefits on steroids. Give it a try, and you too may find that your misconceptions about it are all wrong.

Kristin Addis is a solo female travel expert who inspires women to travel the world in an authentic and adventurous way. A former investment banker who sold all of her belongings and left California in 2012, Kristin has solo traveled the world for over four years, covering every continent (except for Antarctica, but it’s on her list). There’s almost nothing she won’t try and almost nowhere she won’t explore. You can find more of her musings at Be My Travel Muse or on Instagram and Facebook.

Conquering Mountains: The ultimate Guide to Solo Female Travel

conquering mountains: solo female travel by kristin addisFor a complete A-to-Z guide on solo female travel, check out Kristin’s new book, Conquering Mountains. Besides discussing many of the practical tips of preparing and planning your trip, the book addresses the fears, safety, and emotional concerns women have about traveling alone. It features over 20 interviews with other female travel writers and travelers. Click here to learn more about the book and start reading it today!

The post 8 Myths About Solo Female Travel Debunked appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.

Posted from http://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blogs/solo-female-travel-myths/

Woman walking on beach
Kristin Addis from Be My Travel Muse writes our regular column on solo female travel. It’s an important topic I can’t adequately cover, so I brought in an expert to share her advice for other women travelers to help cover the topics important and specific to them! She’s amazing and knowledgable. This month, we are starting the year off with some of the common myths people have about solo female travel!

I had a lot of misconceptions about traveling alone before I went overseas. I thought it might be dangerous, lonely, too much work, or make people think that I didn’t have any friends. Moreover, I always thought that being alone as a woman would make me a target for terrible things (thanks, mainstream media!). Plus, who wants to see all these amazing places completely alone? It sounded like a non-option, at least at first.

Then I realized that nobody had the time to go with me. My friends were working on their careers while I had just decided to take a break from mine. I couldn’t wait. I just had to go, or else I might never go.

So I went alone and found out that all of my assumptions about traveling solo were dead wrong. I wasn’t lonely, I didn’t end up kidnapped, and, in a lot of ways, it was actually way better to travel by myself. The freedom it afforded me, the way it grew my confidence, and all of the new friends I made were huge benefits that wouldn’t have happened it I went with a group of friends.

So for everyone who thinks that solo travel is lonely, dangerous, or boring, I want my first column ofthe new year to be on the common solo female travel myths — and why they are all wrong – to help give you the courage to get over your fears and conquer the year:

Myth #1: Solo traveling means being lonely often.

Solo female travel
The scariest thing about traveling by yourself is the thought that you might be alone for your entire vacation, right? Who wants to travel to the other side of the world only to have to be by herself while looking at the majestic red sunrise over Angkor Wat?

I was really worried about this before I started traveling solo. Thankfully, I came to find that I made more friends in one week on the road than I had in a whole year back at home.

The best thing about traveling solo is that you’re not the only one doing it. More and more women are considering the concept of solo traveling to be realistic these days, and I couldn’t believe how many other solo female travelers there were on the road with me! Since so many other people are in the same boat, they tend to be pretty outgoing and friendly. It’s as simple as staying in a social hostel — you can easily find which those are by doing a quick search on Hostelworld — and heading to the common room. I regularly did that all over Southeast Asia and I rarely felt alone during my years of traveling there.

Myth #2: Solo traveling is only for those who are single.

Solo female hiking
Before I started traveling and meeting people with all kinds of different stories and backgrounds, I figured that if you’re traveling by yourself, it must be because you don’t have a significant other. People who have commitments like a family or partner don’t just go traveling on their own. It must mean there’s a problem in the relationship or that they’re escaping their commitments, right?

Wrong. I came to learn that plenty of people who are in relationships travel alone, and for all kinds of reasons.

It could just be that they have different interests, something many relationship experts say is totally healthy. Maybe their partner can’t get time off from work, or maybe both parties made a conscious decision to do some soul-searching on a solo adventure, even just for a portion of the trip, and meet back up again.

Many solo travelers are single, but there are many more who are in relationships too. Just because you’re not single doesn’t mean you can’t have an awesome trip by yourself.

Myth #3: You must be extraordinarily brave to travel on your own.

Solo woman in cave
A lot of my friends thought I was ultra brave and independent because I was going to travel alone. The honest truth is that I was incredibly scared and overwhelmed with the idea of traveling solo until I finally just got on the plane and went. To fear what you don’t know is just to be human. It’s in our nature.

Despite being terrified, I went anyway. Later I laughed at how scared I had been, after I realized that getting around, meeting new people, and finding things to eat was all way easier than I had ever thought it could be.

You don’t have to be sure of everything and incredibly courageous to go traveling on your own. Those things may come as a nice benefit of traveling solo, but they don’t have to be prerequisites. The hardest part is getting on the plane. After that, it’s surprisingly easy to get around language barriers, figure out timetables, and have an adventure. Plenty of locals speak at least some English, and Google Maps, translation apps, and cellphone connectivity have all made traveling so much easier than it used to be.

Myth #4: You can’t be an introvert.

Woman hiking in mountains
I used to quietly watch the TV in bars or wear my headphones in public places so that I wouldn’t have to talk to anyone. I used to feel pretty paralyzed in a room with someone with a strong personality. Basically, I was kind of awkward.

But an incredible benefit of traveling by myself is that it has made me super outgoing. Even if you have trouble starting a conversation, in a hostel common room, chances are really good that eventually someone will reach out to you and bring you into a conversation. I recall that in the Philippines, a girl tapped me and asked where I’m from, and after chatting for a while, we became friends and hung out all week.

You will probably also find that after a few times approaching new people — which will be incredibly nerve-racking at first — they will be so much more open than you feared that it will be an encouraging surprise. It’s so easy to start a conversation by simply asking somebody where they’re from or where they just came from. I know those are cliché, but they also work, and before you know it, you have something to talk about.

It’s easy to build up confidence around travelers — they’re just really friendly people!

Myth #5: It’s dangerous to travel solo, especially as a woman.

Woman walking in desert
You’ve seen the movie, Taken, right? The one where Liam Neeson’s daughter gets kidnapped in Europe and he kicks major butt and rescues her? Or what about Brokedown Palace, where Claire Danes gets thrown in Thai jail when a handsome stranger plants drugs on her? This is our image of girls traveling the world (thanks, Hollywood!). I’m guessing that, given dramatic stories like these, the biggest argument against solo travel that you might be hearing from your friends and family is that it is dangerous.

First of all, neither of the protagonists in those movies actually was traveling solo. Maybe if they had been, they would have paused and listened to their voices of reason and stayed out of trouble.

Staying safe on the road is all about trusting your intuition, behaving abroad like you would at home. Would you get super drunk alone at a bar at home? Would you walk around alone at night? Talk to the locals at your guesthouse about what you should watch out for, and practice common sense. What kept you alive at home and keeps you alive on the road, too.

For more check out this post all about solo female travel safety.

And take a look at these blogs for inspiration and proof women can travel alone:

Every day millions of women travel the world alone. It’s safe and doable, and you won’t end up in a ditch!

Myth #6: You will constantly get unwanted attention.

Woman walking on beach
It happened from car windows when I was walking home from school at age 14, it happened when I was getting into my car at a random gas station in the middle of nowhere in Nevada, and it happens when I walk down the streets of New York City. Sometimes a boyfriend was only a few steps away — it didn’t matter. Catcalls happen abroad and at home. They’re annoying, yes, but don’t let them keep you from having the awesome solo trip you deserve.

The best way to deal with that kind of attention is to make sure you understand the modesty requirements in the countries that you visit and dress accordingly. Some women suggest wearing a wedding band, but I find that being very confident, looking people in the eye, and being respectfully assertive are all good ways to stand my ground as well.

While simply being a female does open you up for catcalls and unwanted advances in some parts of the world, in many cases, though, it’s quite the opposite, and I’m treated with respect and kindness, particularly because I’m a woman traveling on her own.

Myth #7: It’s way more work because you have to do everything yourself.

Woman walking on beach
If you travel on your own, you will be making all of the decisions.

This is also the biggest benefit of traveling solo. It means that you don’t have to plan ahead if you don’t want to, worry about whether the other person is having fun or not, or stress about doing everything for two or more people. Solo travelers get to have more serendipitous fun, the novelty of which we are hardwired to crave. There’s often room for just one more on a motorbike, in the car, or at a local’s family dinner, and you’ll be able to make split-second decisions without asking anyone first.

I found that the benefit of complete freedom while traveling solo outweighed the extra legwork that I had to do. I also found it easy to just ask a friend which restaurant or activity they liked, or the person working at the hostel counter. It’s not that hard. (Besides, planning everything for multiple people and keeping them happy is a lot of work too.)

Myth #8: Traveling solo is a huge, life-changing decision.

Woman sitting on a glacier
A lot of people sell off everything they have and take off to the other side of the world with a one-way ticket in hand (I’m talking about myself here), but that doesn’t mean that everyone who travels solo has turned her life upside down in order to do it.

It can be as simple as a weekend trip alone to another city, a two-week jaunt to a warm and tropical place you’ve never been, or a monthlong solo backpacking trip in Europe between semesters. It doesn’t have to be a huge deal, and you could come right back to life as you know it before, with a few new adventures and a bit more confidence.

****It turned out that, contrary to what everyone (including me) thought, solo traveling wasn’t dangerous, boring, or lonely at all. It actually was one of the most social activities I’ve ever tried.

I ended up finding that, instead of solo traveling being a disadvantage in any way, it was actually advantageous to be free when I traveled. It endeared me more to locals, and I got to have unique experiences because I could say yes to everything, and that’s something that only solo travelers can say. It’s a big benefit to be able to go where you want when you want, without having to answer to anyone else. There must be a reason why it keeps growing in popularity year after year, right?

If traveling is about the benefits, the time spent in a new reality, and a departure from your normal, everyday life, then to traveling solo is to put those benefits on steroids. Give it a try, and you too may find that your misconceptions about it are all wrong.

Kristin Addis is a solo female travel expert who inspires women to travel the world in an authentic and adventurous way. A former investment banker who sold all of her belongings and left California in 2012, Kristin has solo traveled the world for over four years, covering every continent (except for Antarctica, but it’s on her list). There’s almost nothing she won’t try and almost nowhere she won’t explore. You can find more of her musings at Be My Travel Muse or on Instagram and Facebook.

Conquering Mountains: The ultimate Guide to Solo Female Travel

conquering mountains: solo female travel by kristin addisFor a complete A-to-Z guide on solo female travel, check out Kristin’s new book, Conquering Mountains. Besides discussing many of the practical tips of preparing and planning your trip, the book addresses the fears, safety, and emotional concerns women have about traveling alone. It features over 20 interviews with other female travel writers and travelers. Click here to learn more about the book and start reading it today!

The post 8 Myths About Solo Female Travel Debunked appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.

Discover your next romantic destination, Lake Bled

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/30/discover-your-next-romantic-destination-lake-bled/

Travel forty-five minutes North West of Ljubljana towards the age-old spa town of Bled and a magical world begins to unfold before you. A mesmerising emerald-green lake framed by the towering Karavanke Mountains dwarf the medieval castle cradled upon its slopes. Come the winter and early spring and you are likely to see this landscape […]

Discover your next romantic destination, Lake Bled is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post Discover your next romantic destination, Lake Bled appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/30/discover-your-next-romantic-destination-lake-bled/

Travel forty-five minutes North West of Ljubljana towards the age-old spa town of Bled and a magical world begins to unfold before you. A mesmerising emerald-green lake framed by the towering Karavanke Mountains dwarf the medieval castle cradled upon its slopes. Come the winter and early spring and you are likely to see this landscape […]

Discover your next romantic destination, Lake Bled is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post Discover your next romantic destination, Lake Bled appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

Recipe of the week: Miso lamb cutlets

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/27/recipe-of-the-week/

Flavoursome and succulent, the cutlets partner beautifully with the chilli miso and pickled eggplant. The miso, a traditional Japanese seasoning, gives this dish a delicious savoury flavour. The dish works across all seasons – for a light summer or springtime lunch or dinner partnered with salad greens, or as a heartier meal with a vegetable […]

Recipe of the week: Miso lamb cutlets is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post Recipe of the week: Miso lamb cutlets appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/27/recipe-of-the-week/

Flavoursome and succulent, the cutlets partner beautifully with the chilli miso and pickled eggplant. The miso, a traditional Japanese seasoning, gives this dish a delicious savoury flavour. The dish works across all seasons – for a light summer or springtime lunch or dinner partnered with salad greens, or as a heartier meal with a vegetable […]

Recipe of the week: Miso lamb cutlets is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post Recipe of the week: Miso lamb cutlets appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

5 of most spectacular hotel arrivals in the world

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/27/5-of-most-spectacular-hotel-arrivals-in-the-world/

Long gone are the days of arriving to a hotel to tediously queue at a lobby and await your turn so someone at the reception desk is free to attend to you. Luxury travelers demand more, much, much more. Many of the more boutique hotels and resorts have done away with reception desks, and even […]

5 of most spectacular hotel arrivals in the world is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post 5 of most spectacular hotel arrivals in the world appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

Posted from http://www.aluxurytravelblog.com/2017/01/27/5-of-most-spectacular-hotel-arrivals-in-the-world/

Long gone are the days of arriving to a hotel to tediously queue at a lobby and await your turn so someone at the reception desk is free to attend to you. Luxury travelers demand more, much, much more. Many of the more boutique hotels and resorts have done away with reception desks, and even […]

5 of most spectacular hotel arrivals in the world is a post from A Luxury Travel Blog

The post 5 of most spectacular hotel arrivals in the world appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.

Travel Tip: Put Away Your Damn Phone!

Posted from http://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blogs/travel-phone/

Couple texting

Before you read this post, watch this awesome video:

OK, you watched it? Great! No? Dang. Who has 15 minutes, right?

Well, in this video, Simon Sinek, one of my favorite authors, discusses millennials in the workplace. I found it to be an insightful and incredible discussion on exactly why companies have such a hard time with millennials. To Sinek, one of the major problems is millennials’ addiction to their phones. Back in the day, before a meeting started, you would socialize with your coworkers, ask about their families, talk about work, etc. Now, no one talks because everyone is glued to their phone. It drives him up the wall, because this very important form of socialization and bonding in the workplace is now disappearing.

It’s not just a workplace issue, either. How many times are you out to dinner and everyone is checking their phones? How many times do you walk into a glass door because you are looking intently at the phone (not saying I did this recently or anything)? How often do you talk to someone while staring at the phone (“I’m paying attention, I swear!”)?

When I first started traveling in 2006, if a hostel had a computer, it was a big deal. I remember taking pictures and going to Internet cafés to upload them to my MySpace page or waiting for my turn at the hostel computer to check my email. No one I knew traveled with a phone. If you made plans to meet someone in another city, you just had to hope they would stick to them or wouldn’t get delayed. You were connected sparingly, but that never seemed to matter. You wanted to be disconnected, because that was the whole point — to break away and explore the world.

But over the last few years, I’ve seen a remarkable shift in social interactions in hostels. Now, it’s all like “This hostel’s Wi-Fi doesn’t even reach my dorm room!” While hostels are still incredible places to meet new people, they aren’t as incredible as they used to be, because everyone is on their phone, computer, or iPad, watching Netflix, working, or checking Facebook. No one is just hanging out and interacting with each other like before. I find this really sad and depressing.

I’m not against technology or all this beautiful Wi-Fi. We now have Google Maps, and we can book rooms and flights from our phone, stay in touch easier, and communicate better. Wondering why your friend isn’t at the appointed meeting spot on time? No problem! Now you can just ping them a message on WhatsApp. Problem solved!

But, as much as technology has helped us, I think we’ve really lost one of the most beautiful aspects of travel. Constant distraction keeps us from observing the place we are at and being present in the moment. Too often we’re glued to the phone, Snapchatting and Instagramming that moment but never really being in it. We’re in a hostel reading the news online or chatting with our friends back home instead of meeting people. We’re at dinner looking up Facebook “for just a second,” wondering how many people liked our last photo. Or on some adventure activity but Snapchatting the experience.

A few years ago, I read the book What Got You Here Won’t Get You There. In it, the author Marshall Goldsmith talked about how if you are doing something else while talking to someone, you are subtly signaling to them that they aren’t important, even if you can parrot back everything they said. I thought about that and realized I did that all the time. I was only ever half there. That book made me rethink how I interact with people. It taught me to put away my phone, to make better eye contact, and focus on the people around me.

It was a very hard thing to do, as I was totally addicted to my phone. (And the video above reminded me that recently I’ve backslid into my old ways: too often I use my phone as a crutch when I’m bored or have downtime.)

Last year, as part of my anxiety-reducing initiative, I cut down the amount of work I do when I travel. When I go some place new, I put the computer away. If I’m not going for a “workcation” or a conference, the computer is off.

I write this from Malta. During my four-day jaunt around the island with friends, I didn’t open my computer. I didn’t write. There were a few tweets and posted pictures, and when someone was caught on their phone, we reminded each other to put it down. We focused on enjoying the destination and being present.

I don’t want this to be a “get off my lawn” kind of post, but think about it — how often and how long do you go without your phone? When you travel, how many times are you “pulled away” from the experience while commenting on someone’s last post? Did you travel around the world so you can check on what your friends back home are doing, or did you go for the adventure?

This year, as we travel, let’s pledge to put our damn phones away. Let’s not retreat into our safe zone when we feel slightly uncomfortable around strangers or in silence. Let’s interact with the people and places we are visiting. Observe the amazing scenes around you. Say hello to someone new. Give yourself 15-30 minutes max — and then put the computer or phone away, step out the door, and take in the world!

This year I am going to refocus on getting off my phone and being more present when I travel. Join me in doing so!

If you’re traveling with someone, tell them to remind you to put the phone away. Eventually, you’ll break your habit. If you are traveling alone, leave your phone in your dorm when you go downstairs. You’ll be forced to interact with people.

Let’s make 2017 the year we stop curating our lives, cut the umbilical cord to home, put away our phones, and enjoy the moment and beauty in front of us!

P.S. – Looking for another way to kick start your new year? Over at the forums, we are doing our quarterly Travel Action Challenge, where you can win prizes (like a $100 USD Amazon.com gift card) just for traveling!

The post Travel Tip: Put Away Your Damn Phone! appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.

Posted from http://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blogs/travel-phone/

Couple texting

Before you read this post, watch this awesome video:

OK, you watched it? Great! No? Dang. Who has 15 minutes, right?

Well, in this video, Simon Sinek, one of my favorite authors, discusses millennials in the workplace. I found it to be an insightful and incredible discussion on exactly why companies have such a hard time with millennials. To Sinek, one of the major problems is millennials’ addiction to their phones. Back in the day, before a meeting started, you would socialize with your coworkers, ask about their families, talk about work, etc. Now, no one talks because everyone is glued to their phone. It drives him up the wall, because this very important form of socialization and bonding in the workplace is now disappearing.

It’s not just a workplace issue, either. How many times are you out to dinner and everyone is checking their phones? How many times do you walk into a glass door because you are looking intently at the phone (not saying I did this recently or anything)? How often do you talk to someone while staring at the phone (“I’m paying attention, I swear!”)?

When I first started traveling in 2006, if a hostel had a computer, it was a big deal. I remember taking pictures and going to Internet cafés to upload them to my MySpace page or waiting for my turn at the hostel computer to check my email. No one I knew traveled with a phone. If you made plans to meet someone in another city, you just had to hope they would stick to them or wouldn’t get delayed. You were connected sparingly, but that never seemed to matter. You wanted to be disconnected, because that was the whole point — to break away and explore the world.

But over the last few years, I’ve seen a remarkable shift in social interactions in hostels. Now, it’s all like “This hostel’s Wi-Fi doesn’t even reach my dorm room!” While hostels are still incredible places to meet new people, they aren’t as incredible as they used to be, because everyone is on their phone, computer, or iPad, watching Netflix, working, or checking Facebook. No one is just hanging out and interacting with each other like before. I find this really sad and depressing.

I’m not against technology or all this beautiful Wi-Fi. We now have Google Maps, and we can book rooms and flights from our phone, stay in touch easier, and communicate better. Wondering why your friend isn’t at the appointed meeting spot on time? No problem! Now you can just ping them a message on WhatsApp. Problem solved!

But, as much as technology has helped us, I think we’ve really lost one of the most beautiful aspects of travel. Constant distraction keeps us from observing the place we are at and being present in the moment. Too often we’re glued to the phone, Snapchatting and Instagramming that moment but never really being in it. We’re in a hostel reading the news online or chatting with our friends back home instead of meeting people. We’re at dinner looking up Facebook “for just a second,” wondering how many people liked our last photo. Or on some adventure activity but Snapchatting the experience.

A few years ago, I read the book What Got You Here Won’t Get You There. In it, the author Marshall Goldsmith talked about how if you are doing something else while talking to someone, you are subtly signaling to them that they aren’t important, even if you can parrot back everything they said. I thought about that and realized I did that all the time. I was only ever half there. That book made me rethink how I interact with people. It taught me to put away my phone, to make better eye contact, and focus on the people around me.

It was a very hard thing to do, as I was totally addicted to my phone. (And the video above reminded me that recently I’ve backslid into my old ways: too often I use my phone as a crutch when I’m bored or have downtime.)

Last year, as part of my anxiety-reducing initiative, I cut down the amount of work I do when I travel. When I go some place new, I put the computer away. If I’m not going for a “workcation” or a conference, the computer is off.

I write this from Malta. During my four-day jaunt around the island with friends, I didn’t open my computer. I didn’t write. There were a few tweets and posted pictures, and when someone was caught on their phone, we reminded each other to put it down. We focused on enjoying the destination and being present.

I don’t want this to be a “get off my lawn” kind of post, but think about it — how often and how long do you go without your phone? When you travel, how many times are you “pulled away” from the experience while commenting on someone’s last post? Did you travel around the world so you can check on what your friends back home are doing, or did you go for the adventure?

This year, as we travel, let’s pledge to put our damn phones away. Let’s not retreat into our safe zone when we feel slightly uncomfortable around strangers or in silence. Let’s interact with the people and places we are visiting. Observe the amazing scenes around you. Say hello to someone new. Give yourself 15-30 minutes max — and then put the computer or phone away, step out the door, and take in the world!

This year I am going to refocus on getting off my phone and being more present when I travel. Join me in doing so!

If you’re traveling with someone, tell them to remind you to put the phone away. Eventually, you’ll break your habit. If you are traveling alone, leave your phone in your dorm when you go downstairs. You’ll be forced to interact with people.

Let’s make 2017 the year we stop curating our lives, cut the umbilical cord to home, put away our phones, and enjoy the moment and beauty in front of us!

P.S. – Looking for another way to kick start your new year? Over at the forums, we are doing our quarterly Travel Action Challenge, where you can win prizes (like a $100 USD Amazon.com gift card) just for traveling!

The post Travel Tip: Put Away Your Damn Phone! appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.

How to Find Work Overseas: 15 Ways to Earn Money When You Travel

Posted from http://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blogs/working-overseas/

a luxurious yacht
How much money do you need for your trip?

$1,000? $2,000? $5,000? $50,000?

I’ve estimated that a yearlong trip around the world will cost you an average of $50 per day. That includes day-to-day expenses, flights, gear, insurance, and everything in between. (It’s why my book is called How to Travel the World on $50 a Day!)

For most people, the thought of saving thousands of dollars to travel the world — or just travel at all — is a daunting prospect. While there are many ways to save money and travel on an ultra-tight budget (less than $50 a day), for some, there’s no amount of spending cuts or saving tips that will help them save enough. (Of course, to me, being broke is the best reason to go travel but that’s another story.)

Reading articles on how people saved [insert some crazy amount here] for travel (and how you can do it too!) can make you dispirited. “I could never do that,” you say. “Sure, those people saved tens of thousands making minimum wage, but I can’t even afford food.” All those articles on travel blogs, Elite Daily, Buzzfeed, and the like do people a great disservice — and are sometimes unrealistic.

I admit I’m guilty of this too. I’ve highlighted those folks and have often talked about how mindsets just need to be changed. I’ve said, “You can save all this money too” — without also saying “but if you can’t, it is OK because there’s another option.”

Travel within the budget you have, not the budget you wish you had. If you can’t save X, who cares? Just do the best you can with what you have. I think what gets lost in all those articles is that no matter how much money you save, that number is good enough. It’s not all or nothing.

I recently talked to someone who saved $5,000 for his trip. It took him close to a year to get there. Instead of giving up his dream, he simply decided to go to Central and South America. This part of the world is cheaper and his money would last longer. Moreover, he decided to do some volunteering to help cover his costs. He’ll go as long as his money lasts, but he’s still going!

If you don’t have as much money to travel as you want, consider option B: working overseas. Leave with what you have and then find work along the way to keep your wallet flush with cash — and keep you traveling.

It’s an option not enough travelers consider. Many people know about it but few actually do it.

But it’s not as hard to do as you might imagine.

Working abroad is a unique and wonderful experience. It provides new insights into a country. It exposes you to a different culture. And it allows you to learn a new language, meet new people, and get a new perspective on the world. It’s an experience not many people get a chance to have. I worked in Thailand and Taiwan and it was life changing. I learned more about myself during that time than I did at any other point in my travels.

Finding work overseas is an informal process, and if you remember you are looking for a job rather than a career — and stay flexible — you’ll be able to find work anywhere. Whole economies and industries are built around employing travelers. (Heck, I don’t think the Australian economy would survive without the labor backpackers and travelers provide!) Many of the jobs will be unglamorous and hard, but they will allow you to earn enough money to keep you on the road longer.

Here are some examples of jobs that are easy for travelers to get and often don’t require a long commitment:

Teaching English (or any language!)

Guy teaching students
This is the easiest type of job to get for native English speakers. Teaching jobs are incredibly abundant around the world, especially in Southeast Asia. Really, when in doubt, find a teaching job. They pay well, the hours are flexible, many many countries offer huge bonuses, and some schools will pay for your flight over. I saved over ten thousand dollars by teaching in Thailand. I’ve had friends pay off their student loans by teaching in South Korea. There are a lot of online resources for potential teachers, but if you’re interested I wrote a huge digital step-by-step guide on how to get a job!.

Not a native English speaker? Teach your own language. There’s a language school out there for everyone, especially in big international cities! You can also use websites like iTalki to teach people your native language online (if anyone wants to teach me Swedish, let me know!). You can do this from anywhere in the world and you don’t need any special accreditation. Sign in, talk, and get paid! (Benny Lewis from Fluent in 3 Months is a huge fan of the site — and he’s the best language expert I know, so it must be good!)

I taught in Thailand and Taiwan: not only did I have a fantastic time being an expat, I also learned a lot about myself and living overseas, and made enough money to keep me on the road for years. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.

Get seasonal work

ski instructor with students
Move with the seasons and work in ski resorts, as a camping guide, on boats, in bars or restaurants, whatever. There are many options — wherever there’s a big tourist season, you’ll find a big demand for temporary labor. Make sure you get to your destination well before the season starts to secure a job — if you show up mid-season, all the good jobs will be taken. Ask around at hostels in the area and they will be able to point you in the right direction!

Do freelance work online

girl doing freelance work
If you have a background in web services, design, programming, or anything tech, a website like UpWork is a super way to find virtual work as you travel. There’s a lot of competition, but if you build up your portfolio, you can get a lot of work over time. I have a friend who gets all her freelance consulting jobs from UpWork and it pays her enough so she can keep traveling. If you don’t have tech skills, you can still start a profile and find clients for a variety of research-based and virtual assistant jobs.

Task Rabbit, Outsource.com, and Fiverr are three other sites for finding online work.

Work on a cruise ship

people gathered on a cruise ship
This option is an excellent way to earn good money while getting a taste of the world, gaining some solid work experience, and networking with people (both fellow crew and passengers) from around the world. Many of the easy, low-wage jobs usually go to people from developing countries, but there are many other jobs available to choose from.

This book by Wandering Earl (who worked on a cruise ship) is a great place to get started.

Under 30? Get a working holiday visa!

cubicles in an office
Working holiday schemes allow people under the age of 30 to work abroad. These programs tend to be used mostly by gap-year travelers, students, or young adult backpackers. Most of the countries that offer these programs are English-speaking Commonwealth countries such as Canada, England, New Zealand, and Australia (under 35 now). The visa application process is pretty simple, and the visas are usually issued for one year. Typically, the visa comes with the stipulation that you can’t work in one place for more than six months.

Most of the working holiday jobs you can find are typically service or low-wage office jobs. Most people become office assistants, laborers, bartenders, or waiters. The pay is not always great, but it’s enough to live off of and usually will give you a little extra money to save for traveling.

For these jobs, you’ll need to bite the bullet, fly to these countries, and look for work when you land. While sites like Gumtree have some listings, you’ll find the majority of work when you land. Many companies specialize in placing travelers. And hostels usually have job boards and can offer a lot of assistance in finding work!

Be an au pair

a young woman taking care of a baby
Love kids? Take care of someone else’s! You’ll get room, board, and a weekly paycheck. You’ll have to be around a lot to watch the kids, but you’ll normally get the weekends off and some vacation time to explore the country! These are some popular websites for finding au pair jobs:

This is also a good article about what being an au pair is like.

Work in a hostel

people checking in at a hostel
Hostels are often looking for staff to work the desk, clean, or show the guests around town. You can often trade a few hours of cleaning for a free bed. Even if you aren’t getting paid, but just getting free room and board, it’s still a way to save money. When you aren’t spending, you’re saving! Moreover, these jobs can often be for as long as you want — a day, a week, a month… whatever you want and they need.

Become a scuba diving instructor

scuba instructor diving with group
If you are a certified diver and want to become an instructor (additional classes may be needed), there are dozens of huge scuba destinations around the world where you can easily find work (including Thailand, Cambodia, Honduras, the Caribbean, and Bali). You can find jobs just by going there and asking around.

Use your skills!

man preparing food
Use your existing skills and talents to find work. Teach people how to play music or how to dance, cut hair, offer business consulting, cook for people — use whatever skills you have to find a job. Don’t be shy. Be creative! Websites like Craigslist and Gumtree are two places to advertise your abilities and find work. Where there’s a will, there is a way!

Creating your job is one of the easiest ways to get a job. Somewhere at the destination you are going is a person who wants to learn the skill you have. Teach them. Get paid.

Become a bartender

bartender performing tricks
Bars need bartenders. So you’ll find plenty of bars that pay cash to travelers looking for work. Bars in party destinations or at hostels are the best places to start looking, as they often have a high turnover and the work can be steady. In countries that have working holiday visas, these jobs also often go to travelers. I’ve also seen bars in Southeast Asia and Europe hire travelers under the table to do work and pass out fliers. It’s not a lot of money but it’s enough to cover some meals and drinks.

Work in a restaurant

waiter serving customers
In that same vein, waitstaff, busboys, and dishwashers are always in demand, since people come and go from those jobs very frequently. These jobs are easy to get, especially in popular backpacking and party destinations, as well as large cities. Again, in countries that have working holiday visas, travelers become the backbone of the service economy and jobs can often be easy to get.

Do volunteer work

woman picking fruit
While these jobs don’t pay, you’ll save money on room and board, which will keep you on the road longer. Plus, you’ll be doing something good. Win-win! You don’t have to spend a lot of money with large global organizations in order to volunteer; those companies just end up keeping a large cut for themselves for “operations.” Instead, when you arrive at a destination, find volunteer opportunities where your time (and money) can help the most. I also highly recommend the website Grassroots Volunteering; it’s the best site for finding small-scale, local volunteer initiatives. Additionally, Workaway.info and WWOOFing are other good resources to find volunteer opportunities.

Be a tour guide

tour guide leading group
Use your love of travel to work in travel! Tour companies are always on the lookout for new tour guides. This is more of a “real” job than the rest, but it’s a fun (though tiring) means of employment. The pay isn’t great, but you get your expenses paid while on the tour and get to meet people from all over the world. Companies that often hire travelers are Busabout, Kiwi Experience, New Europe Walking Tours, and Contiki. (Note: these jobs often require a long-term commitment.)

Work on a yacht

a luxurious yacht
If you love the water, work on a boat (and forever be singing “I’m on a Boat” by Lonely Island). Yachting jobs are surprisingly easy to get without much experience (though it helps), and you’ll be able to sail around while doing so. One of my readers did it so she could see the world. You can find jobs on the following websites:

Note: Positions are long-term, and you’ll be required to get a STCW 95 certificate, which covers all basic yacht training, including fire and water safety training.

Take whatever you can find

woman holding cash
You can always trade your labor for pay. There are a lot of short-term jobs around the world, jobs that you can get on the fly. If you’re willing to work a few hours each day in exchange for room, board, and extra cash, you will always find something you can do. Here are several incredible resources for finding jobs as a traveler:

****

For those who want to work abroad but aren’t interested in any of the above, finding work is a bit harder — but not impossible. For older travelers or travelers with a skill or master’s degree, you probably want a better-paying, more traditional job relating to your skill set. You can find them, but it takes a lot more time.

In the European Union, visa rules require companies to give job preference to people within the EU before they hire someone else. In Asia, most companies want a foreigner to be able to speak the local language.

Finding “good” jobs requires more work and a lot of networking. While there are some job boards (see below) that can help, getting a more traditional job overseas requires you to either get contacted by a company or building your network and pounding the pavement when you get there!

Some steps you can take to find a job overseas:

  • Search job boards before you leave.
  • Contact expat groups before you leave (and when you arrive). Attend their meetups.
  • Create a LinkedIn profile.
  • Bring copies of your résumé, recommendations, and any other professional certificates.
  • Make business cards.
  • Go to as many networking events as possible.
  • Apply for jobs from local job boards.

You can find good jobs, but it is not easy. I’ve had many friends who have decided to stay in cities longer and, as they built up their social network, they’ve found traditional jobs.

Here are some resources for finding jobs overseas:

  • Council on International Educational Exchange Work Abroad Program – It offers students and recent graduates short-term work permits for Australia, New Zealand, France, Germany, Ireland, Canada, and Costa Rica. The Council also offers advice and support, but it is your responsibility to find a job.
  • Alliances Abroad – Guarantees paid work placement before your departure and organizes accommodations.
  • BUNAC – Offers work-abroad programs in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.
  • Peace Corps – A US governmental program that places people around the world. Open only to US citizens. Volunteers get a stipend and money at the end of their contract. The program also helps pay off student loans.
  • US State Department – Has a good list of job placement websites.
  • Go Abroad –  This site also has a list of available jobs from around the world. It’s geared towards younger travelers.

****

Whether you are going to teach English, wait tables, bartend, sit in an office, work at a hostel, or land a high-paying job in your field, working overseas is something that will change you forever. Living in a different country is a unique experience not many people get to have. It teaches you a lot about yourself and your perceptions of the world. At the end of the day, that is what travel is about.

Don’t let money woes get in the way of travel. If you are creative and flexible about what you want to do, you will find work. Remember you aren’t looking for a career — you’re just looking for work. When you are flexible in what you want to do, there will always be work available to help increase your travel funds and get you to the next destination. You can worry about a career when you come home!

Don’t worry bout saving a lot of money for your trip. If you can’t, just get out there, find a job, work overseas, earn money, and then explore the world longer!

P.S. Looking for another way to kick start your new year? Over at the forums, we are doing our quarterly Travel Action Challenge, where you win prizes (like a $100 USD Amazon.com gift card)!

P.P.S. If you would like to help underprivileged students travel more, we’re currently fundraising for a group of students to go volunteer in Ecuador. Help us reach our goal, change someone’s life by exposing them to the world of travel, and get some travel swag in the process. It’s a trip win!

Photo Credits: 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

The post How to Find Work Overseas: 15 Ways to Earn Money When You Travel appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.

Posted from http://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blogs/working-overseas/

a luxurious yacht
How much money do you need for your trip?

$1,000? $2,000? $5,000? $50,000?

I’ve estimated that a yearlong trip around the world will cost you an average of $50 per day. That includes day-to-day expenses, flights, gear, insurance, and everything in between. (It’s why my book is called How to Travel the World on $50 a Day!)

For most people, the thought of saving thousands of dollars to travel the world — or just travel at all — is a daunting prospect. While there are many ways to save money and travel on an ultra-tight budget (less than $50 a day), for some, there’s no amount of spending cuts or saving tips that will help them save enough. (Of course, to me, being broke is the best reason to go travel but that’s another story.)

Reading articles on how people saved [insert some crazy amount here] for travel (and how you can do it too!) can make you dispirited. “I could never do that,” you say. “Sure, those people saved tens of thousands making minimum wage, but I can’t even afford food.” All those articles on travel blogs, Elite Daily, Buzzfeed, and the like do people a great disservice — and are sometimes unrealistic.

I admit I’m guilty of this too. I’ve highlighted those folks and have often talked about how mindsets just need to be changed. I’ve said, “You can save all this money too” — without also saying “but if you can’t, it is OK because there’s another option.”

Travel within the budget you have, not the budget you wish you had. If you can’t save X, who cares? Just do the best you can with what you have. I think what gets lost in all those articles is that no matter how much money you save, that number is good enough. It’s not all or nothing.

I recently talked to someone who saved $5,000 for his trip. It took him close to a year to get there. Instead of giving up his dream, he simply decided to go to Central and South America. This part of the world is cheaper and his money would last longer. Moreover, he decided to do some volunteering to help cover his costs. He’ll go as long as his money lasts, but he’s still going!

If you don’t have as much money to travel as you want, consider option B: working overseas. Leave with what you have and then find work along the way to keep your wallet flush with cash — and keep you traveling.

It’s an option not enough travelers consider. Many people know about it but few actually do it.

But it’s not as hard to do as you might imagine.

Working abroad is a unique and wonderful experience. It provides new insights into a country. It exposes you to a different culture. And it allows you to learn a new language, meet new people, and get a new perspective on the world. It’s an experience not many people get a chance to have. I worked in Thailand and Taiwan and it was life changing. I learned more about myself during that time than I did at any other point in my travels.

Finding work overseas is an informal process, and if you remember you are looking for a job rather than a career — and stay flexible — you’ll be able to find work anywhere. Whole economies and industries are built around employing travelers. (Heck, I don’t think the Australian economy would survive without the labor backpackers and travelers provide!) Many of the jobs will be unglamorous and hard, but they will allow you to earn enough money to keep you on the road longer.

Here are some examples of jobs that are easy for travelers to get and often don’t require a long commitment:

Teaching English (or any language!)

Guy teaching students
This is the easiest type of job to get for native English speakers. Teaching jobs are incredibly abundant around the world, especially in Southeast Asia. Really, when in doubt, find a teaching job. They pay well, the hours are flexible, many many countries offer huge bonuses, and some schools will pay for your flight over. I saved over ten thousand dollars by teaching in Thailand. I’ve had friends pay off their student loans by teaching in South Korea. There are a lot of online resources for potential teachers, but if you’re interested I wrote a huge digital step-by-step guide on how to get a job!.

Not a native English speaker? Teach your own language. There’s a language school out there for everyone, especially in big international cities! You can also use websites like iTalki to teach people your native language online (if anyone wants to teach me Swedish, let me know!). You can do this from anywhere in the world and you don’t need any special accreditation. Sign in, talk, and get paid! (Benny Lewis from Fluent in 3 Months is a huge fan of the site — and he’s the best language expert I know, so it must be good!)

I taught in Thailand and Taiwan: not only did I have a fantastic time being an expat, I also learned a lot about myself and living overseas, and made enough money to keep me on the road for years. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.

Get seasonal work

ski instructor with students
Move with the seasons and work in ski resorts, as a camping guide, on boats, in bars or restaurants, whatever. There are many options — wherever there’s a big tourist season, you’ll find a big demand for temporary labor. Make sure you get to your destination well before the season starts to secure a job — if you show up mid-season, all the good jobs will be taken. Ask around at hostels in the area and they will be able to point you in the right direction!

Do freelance work online

girl doing freelance work
If you have a background in web services, design, programming, or anything tech, a website like UpWork is a super way to find virtual work as you travel. There’s a lot of competition, but if you build up your portfolio, you can get a lot of work over time. I have a friend who gets all her freelance consulting jobs from UpWork and it pays her enough so she can keep traveling. If you don’t have tech skills, you can still start a profile and find clients for a variety of research-based and virtual assistant jobs.

Task Rabbit, Outsource.com, and Fiverr are three other sites for finding online work.

Work on a cruise ship

people gathered on a cruise ship
This option is an excellent way to earn good money while getting a taste of the world, gaining some solid work experience, and networking with people (both fellow crew and passengers) from around the world. Many of the easy, low-wage jobs usually go to people from developing countries, but there are many other jobs available to choose from.

This book by Wandering Earl (who worked on a cruise ship) is a great place to get started.

Under 30? Get a working holiday visa!

cubicles in an office
Working holiday schemes allow people under the age of 30 to work abroad. These programs tend to be used mostly by gap-year travelers, students, or young adult backpackers. Most of the countries that offer these programs are English-speaking Commonwealth countries such as Canada, England, New Zealand, and Australia (under 35 now). The visa application process is pretty simple, and the visas are usually issued for one year. Typically, the visa comes with the stipulation that you can’t work in one place for more than six months.

Most of the working holiday jobs you can find are typically service or low-wage office jobs. Most people become office assistants, laborers, bartenders, or waiters. The pay is not always great, but it’s enough to live off of and usually will give you a little extra money to save for traveling.

For these jobs, you’ll need to bite the bullet, fly to these countries, and look for work when you land. While sites like Gumtree have some listings, you’ll find the majority of work when you land. Many companies specialize in placing travelers. And hostels usually have job boards and can offer a lot of assistance in finding work!

Be an au pair

a young woman taking care of a baby
Love kids? Take care of someone else’s! You’ll get room, board, and a weekly paycheck. You’ll have to be around a lot to watch the kids, but you’ll normally get the weekends off and some vacation time to explore the country! These are some popular websites for finding au pair jobs:

This is also a good article about what being an au pair is like.

Work in a hostel

people checking in at a hostel
Hostels are often looking for staff to work the desk, clean, or show the guests around town. You can often trade a few hours of cleaning for a free bed. Even if you aren’t getting paid, but just getting free room and board, it’s still a way to save money. When you aren’t spending, you’re saving! Moreover, these jobs can often be for as long as you want — a day, a week, a month… whatever you want and they need.

Become a scuba diving instructor

scuba instructor diving with group
If you are a certified diver and want to become an instructor (additional classes may be needed), there are dozens of huge scuba destinations around the world where you can easily find work (including Thailand, Cambodia, Honduras, the Caribbean, and Bali). You can find jobs just by going there and asking around.

Use your skills!

man preparing food
Use your existing skills and talents to find work. Teach people how to play music or how to dance, cut hair, offer business consulting, cook for people — use whatever skills you have to find a job. Don’t be shy. Be creative! Websites like Craigslist and Gumtree are two places to advertise your abilities and find work. Where there’s a will, there is a way!

Creating your job is one of the easiest ways to get a job. Somewhere at the destination you are going is a person who wants to learn the skill you have. Teach them. Get paid.

Become a bartender

bartender performing tricks
Bars need bartenders. So you’ll find plenty of bars that pay cash to travelers looking for work. Bars in party destinations or at hostels are the best places to start looking, as they often have a high turnover and the work can be steady. In countries that have working holiday visas, these jobs also often go to travelers. I’ve also seen bars in Southeast Asia and Europe hire travelers under the table to do work and pass out fliers. It’s not a lot of money but it’s enough to cover some meals and drinks.

Work in a restaurant

waiter serving customers
In that same vein, waitstaff, busboys, and dishwashers are always in demand, since people come and go from those jobs very frequently. These jobs are easy to get, especially in popular backpacking and party destinations, as well as large cities. Again, in countries that have working holiday visas, travelers become the backbone of the service economy and jobs can often be easy to get.

Do volunteer work

woman picking fruit
While these jobs don’t pay, you’ll save money on room and board, which will keep you on the road longer. Plus, you’ll be doing something good. Win-win! You don’t have to spend a lot of money with large global organizations in order to volunteer; those companies just end up keeping a large cut for themselves for “operations.” Instead, when you arrive at a destination, find volunteer opportunities where your time (and money) can help the most. I also highly recommend the website Grassroots Volunteering; it’s the best site for finding small-scale, local volunteer initiatives. Additionally, Workaway.info and WWOOFing are other good resources to find volunteer opportunities.

Be a tour guide

tour guide leading group
Use your love of travel to work in travel! Tour companies are always on the lookout for new tour guides. This is more of a “real” job than the rest, but it’s a fun (though tiring) means of employment. The pay isn’t great, but you get your expenses paid while on the tour and get to meet people from all over the world. Companies that often hire travelers are Busabout, Kiwi Experience, New Europe Walking Tours, and Contiki. (Note: these jobs often require a long-term commitment.)

Work on a yacht

a luxurious yacht
If you love the water, work on a boat (and forever be singing “I’m on a Boat” by Lonely Island). Yachting jobs are surprisingly easy to get without much experience (though it helps), and you’ll be able to sail around while doing so. One of my readers did it so she could see the world. You can find jobs on the following websites:

Note: Positions are long-term, and you’ll be required to get a STCW 95 certificate, which covers all basic yacht training, including fire and water safety training.

Take whatever you can find

woman holding cash
You can always trade your labor for pay. There are a lot of short-term jobs around the world, jobs that you can get on the fly. If you’re willing to work a few hours each day in exchange for room, board, and extra cash, you will always find something you can do. Here are several incredible resources for finding jobs as a traveler:

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For those who want to work abroad but aren’t interested in any of the above, finding work is a bit harder — but not impossible. For older travelers or travelers with a skill or master’s degree, you probably want a better-paying, more traditional job relating to your skill set. You can find them, but it takes a lot more time.

In the European Union, visa rules require companies to give job preference to people within the EU before they hire someone else. In Asia, most companies want a foreigner to be able to speak the local language.

Finding “good” jobs requires more work and a lot of networking. While there are some job boards (see below) that can help, getting a more traditional job overseas requires you to either get contacted by a company or building your network and pounding the pavement when you get there!

Some steps you can take to find a job overseas:

  • Search job boards before you leave.
  • Contact expat groups before you leave (and when you arrive). Attend their meetups.
  • Create a LinkedIn profile.
  • Bring copies of your résumé, recommendations, and any other professional certificates.
  • Make business cards.
  • Go to as many networking events as possible.
  • Apply for jobs from local job boards.

You can find good jobs, but it is not easy. I’ve had many friends who have decided to stay in cities longer and, as they built up their social network, they’ve found traditional jobs.

Here are some resources for finding jobs overseas:

  • Council on International Educational Exchange Work Abroad Program – It offers students and recent graduates short-term work permits for Australia, New Zealand, France, Germany, Ireland, Canada, and Costa Rica. The Council also offers advice and support, but it is your responsibility to find a job.
  • Alliances Abroad – Guarantees paid work placement before your departure and organizes accommodations.
  • BUNAC – Offers work-abroad programs in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.
  • Peace Corps – A US governmental program that places people around the world. Open only to US citizens. Volunteers get a stipend and money at the end of their contract. The program also helps pay off student loans.
  • US State Department – Has a good list of job placement websites.
  • Go Abroad –  This site also has a list of available jobs from around the world. It’s geared towards younger travelers.

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Whether you are going to teach English, wait tables, bartend, sit in an office, work at a hostel, or land a high-paying job in your field, working overseas is something that will change you forever. Living in a different country is a unique experience not many people get to have. It teaches you a lot about yourself and your perceptions of the world. At the end of the day, that is what travel is about.

Don’t let money woes get in the way of travel. If you are creative and flexible about what you want to do, you will find work. Remember you aren’t looking for a career — you’re just looking for work. When you are flexible in what you want to do, there will always be work available to help increase your travel funds and get you to the next destination. You can worry about a career when you come home!

Don’t worry bout saving a lot of money for your trip. If you can’t, just get out there, find a job, work overseas, earn money, and then explore the world longer!

P.S. Looking for another way to kick start your new year? Over at the forums, we are doing our quarterly Travel Action Challenge, where you win prizes (like a $100 USD Amazon.com gift card)!

P.P.S. If you would like to help underprivileged students travel more, we’re currently fundraising for a group of students to go volunteer in Ecuador. Help us reach our goal, change someone’s life by exposing them to the world of travel, and get some travel swag in the process. It’s a trip win!

Photo Credits: 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

The post How to Find Work Overseas: 15 Ways to Earn Money When You Travel appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.